News: Diving into the mega-horsepower Dodge Charger Ghoul • New Dodge Ad Showcases Fast and Furious Connection

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somber Offline OP
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[i]Mods please move if this is not the correct place[/i]

[img]https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/546d5be820e46e51d1ab7c00cdd521830f16328d/282_160_4061_2436/master/4061.jpg?width=620&quality=85&auto=format&fit=max&s=4bb6382fc70c1b1a32d5d40716ec52ca[/img]

[url=https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/22/electric-vehicles-close-to-tipping-point-of-mass-adoption][color:blue]An article from [i]The Guardian[/i][/color][/url] on the expectation of a changeover from gasoline cars to electrics. Some takeaways that interested me: [list]
  • [*]global sales of electric cars rose 43% in 2020.
  • [*]several analysts are projecting price parity of electrics with equivalent gas cars (without incentives) by 2025. This seems to coincide with the long anticipated battery cost milestone of $100/kWh.
  • [*]in 2010, the cost of a 30kWh battery pack was $30,000. Today the same capacity battery pack costs $4,100.
  • [*]Bloomberg projects battery costs of $60/kWh by 2030.
  • [/list]
    I'm becoming more convinced that demand for purely gasoline cars is going to decline rapidly at some point in the next 5 years or so. I plan to never buy another new gasoline-only car. I have been strongly considering a Pacifica Hybrid, but I'm going to try to keep my 2011 Grand Caravan going as long as I can to see what happens in the pure electric minivan space.

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    Yup. I think hybrids are the ideal solution for most people, since most people live in an urban or suburban area where stopping and starting uses most of the fuel. I haven't moved over myself just because I still like small cars with manual transmissions, but those are going to disappear, all at once, probably within five years—save for a few oddballs. For those who think that can't happen, think how quickly they disappeared from midsize cars...

    Those who do almost all their driving on the highway will still have gasoline cars for two more decades.

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    I see the advances in electric car technology, but I just don't see the related improvements in the infrastructure. Can the grid handle the overnight charging of so many electric vehicles. Can charging times be reduced so they are a viable alternative to refilling at a gas stations? If they even take 30 minutes, you will need many more charging stations than gas stations. I realize that the whole paradigm can change if charging stations are installed at places like restaurants and work places; but long distance traveling needs to be addressed. I don't see the same urgency related to the supporting technologies. Maybe I am missing it.

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    [quote=djsamuel post_id=141 time=1612096529 user_id=80] I see the advances in electric car technology, but I just don't see the related improvements in the infrastructure. Can the grid handle the overnight charging of so many electric vehicles.[/quote] I don't know. I'm seeing a surprising number of people installing grid-tied solar power systems on their houses. I imagine this strains the grid in the opposite direction. Are power companies having to put in storage capacity for these? [quote=djsamuel post_id=141 time=1612096529 user_id=80] Can charging times be reduced so they are a viable alternative to refilling at a gas stations? If they even take 30 minutes, you will need many more charging stations than gas stations. [/quote] I'm not so sure of this. In my case, I go to a gas station once or twice a week. If I had an EV with 300 mile range, I think I would have need of a charging station only a handful of times per year. The Federal Highway Administration says the average American drives 13,500 miles per year, which is an average of 37 miles per day. If they have access to charging at home, then the average person would only ever need a charging station during long road trips. I think we'd need much fewer charging stations than gas stations.

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    The grid cannot today handle everyone having an electric car, but we are talking about a 30-year transition. Grids can be upgraded with remarkable speed when the money is there.

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    [quote=Dave post_id=147 time=1612128820 user_id=2] The grid cannot today handle everyone having an electric car, but we are talking about a 30-year transition. Grids can be upgraded with remarkable speed when the money is there. [/quote] I don't disagree at all. However, I would hope there would be the same amount of advanced planning related to the infrastructure as there is to pushing the change on the manufacturing side. Doesn't seem fair to push the manufacturers to plan for the transition without the assurance that the government is doing their part to provide the necessary foundations for acceptance of the new technology. I used to be resistant to the change to electric, but the technology is finally getting close. I'm 61 now, and even the possibility of autonomous vehicles is getting very attractive. Before, I hated the idea, but now the thought of being able to remain independent in an autonomous vehicle as I age is becoming more appealing. Also, as I experience the deteriorating driving skills of the average driver here in Florida the thought of a computer controlling a car sounds even more appealing. :D

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    Grids are mainly done by NGOs as I recall. Some are “getting it.” Others are slower but they will all get there. European grids tend to favor renewable energy and ramp nat-gas plants up and down as needed; US grids tend to favor nuclear and fossil-fuel plants and shut off renewables as needed. Personally I'd like to see more clever energy storage systems, e.g. convert power to hydrogen if there's too much, assuming that process can be ramped up and down as needed. Heck, take the excess power on windy, sunny days and desalinize water with it... rather than putting the brakes onto wind turbines... but yes, people are working on it. Scientists and engineers tend to be clever people. (I don't recall who it was, but someone suggested using cars as storage for renewable energy once they reach critical mass... that one I think is goofy.)

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    The EV cars may sell well in the EU due to the high gas prices there. But here in the US I don't see the EV ready for prime time yet ?

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    [quote=MoparFL post_id=236 time=1613328435 user_id=106] The EV cars may sell well in the EU due to the high gas prices there. But here in the US I don't see the EV ready for prime time yet ? [/quote] Agreed. Even though I've wanted an electric car for a long time, I haven't bought one. Until they are no more expensive (without incentives) than a comparable gas car, I won't buy. However, the price difference is slimming down pretty rapidly. I have a feeling I'll be buying one within the next 5 years.

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    Jaguar/Land Rover just announced they're joining the EV party.

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    If you're interested in who is offering EVs currently, InsideEVs maintains a pretty nice little EV comparison table:

    [img]https://cdn.motor1.com/images/custom/bev-car-comparisons-us-2021-02-08-img.png[/img]

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    I can't help but notice that nearly all the acceleration times are under 7 seconds, with quite a few under 6 seconds. The Bolt price is being dropped by a few thousand dollars.

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    Jaguar already has an EV, don't they? The F or some such?

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    New Ioniq 5 just added - around $40,000, single-motor 0-60 around 7.4 with 300 miles of range; two-motor 0-60 in 5.1 with 270 mile range; supposed to be a full-size interior according to the auto writers who saw it.

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    Originally Posted by Dave
    New Ioniq 5 just added - around $40,000, single-motor 0-60 around 7.4 with 300 miles of range; two-motor 0-60 in 5.1 with 270 mile range; supposed to be a full-size interior according to the auto writers who saw it.
    That is making a big headway into a car usuable by many people. If they can get the charging times down, then it can really take off.

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    Reading the comments on Allpar, I find that electric cars must absolutely have the following:
    * 600 mile range
    * 5 minute recharging
    * 20 year battery life
    * No impact on the environment (no aluminum, lead, or lithium)
    * Price comparable to cheapest car in the class (or in some cases, in the form factor)

    What's more, electric cars will:
    * Destroy the grid, which can never be updated, upgraded, or added to
    * Cause electricity prices to skyrocket, because we can never add generating capacity

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    New Dodge Ad Showcases Fast and Furious Connection

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