Stellantis working harder on rebuilding, recycling parts

Today, Stellantis issued a more detailed description of its new Circular Economy business unit, part of its Dare Forward 2030 plan. The strategy stems from the old idea of reuse, repair, and recycle—in this case, remanufacture/repair, reuse, and recycle.

One part of the plan is increasing the company’s internal rebuilding of parts where possible—taking them apart, cleaning, and rebuilding them to their own specifications for new parts. Over 12,000 parts across 40 product lines are available, and more will presumably be added. The company has 21 locations around the world which work on electric vehicle batteries.

B-parts / SUSTAINera

A new “B-Parts” e-commerce platform recovers parts which are still in good condition from end-of-life vehicles, reselling them in 155 countries (parts options are limited at the moment but more are being added; the platform covers Europe, the US, and other countries).

Finally, production scraps and end-of-life vehicles are fed back into the manufacturing process; according to Stellantis, one million recycled parts have been collected in the last six months.

The Circular Economy Hub will launch in Italy in 2023 at the Mirafiori Complex; it will including vehicle reconditioning and dismantling and parts rebuilding. The goal is to expand this business around the world. This effort builds on that of Aramis, which Peugeot bought in 2016; by the end of 2022, Aramis will have seven refurbishing centers across Europe.

The Circular Economy unit will use “local loops,” keeping products and materials within countries where possible. As one example, in Brazil, starter motors and alternators are rebuilt and sold across a thousand local dealerships.

Stellantis is launching a new label for parts and accessories which cut up to 80% of the materials of new parts, along with using half the energy. The SUSTAINera label will be used with rebuilt parts.

1 thought on “Stellantis working harder on rebuilding, recycling parts”

  1. This is good to hear, I hope it’s truly a net benefit to Mother Earth, not just corporate “greenwashing’.

    I also hope the Stellantis engineers themselves do the calculations to determine net benefit of a given reuse/recycling scheme. If they hire a consulting firm to do the calcs, they’re likely to just be told what they want to hear, rather than the true, verifiable bottom line on net environmental benefit or net environmental loss.

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