Do not drive your 2005-10 Charger, Challenger, Magnum, or 300—says STLA

Stellantis has issued a do-not-drive alert to the owners of around 276,000  Dodge Chargers, Challengers, and Magnums, and Chrysler 300/300Cs, all from the 2005-10 model years until making sure they have had a Takata airbag recall done.

2008 Dodge Challenger SRT

The company issued a recall on Takata airbags quite some time ago, but there are apparently quite a few car owners who never had the work done. Recently, though, two and possibly three people have been killed by Takata airbag incidents. The original airbags, used by most major automakers, get more dangerous with age.

Dealers will replace the airbags for free. The old airbags may send metal fragments flying at high speed, causing over 30 deaths and 400 injuries globally. Toyota, GM, Ford, and others have issued similar recalls.

14 thoughts on “Do not drive your 2005-10 Charger, Challenger, Magnum, or 300—says STLA”

    • It is possible yours did not have one of the bad ones and they knew it? Or it got lost in the mail? you can simply go to http://www.nhtsa.gov and look up your car. Type in your vin and it will show you every recall issued for your car.

  1. I had the drivers side air bag done but I don’t trust any dealership techs to pull my dash to replace the passenger side. Someone always messes something up. My challenger only has 10k miles and my dash is mint with NO squeaks, rattling or any noise.

  2. What I don’t understand is the work is free!…..get off your lazy butt and have it done. I had my truck done asafp

    • Dealership experience, in particular at Big Three dealerships, can be far less than “stellar” experiences. Taking time off work costs money. Arranging transportation to and from dealership is a hassle. Asking boss for time off can be an issue for some workers.

      Yes, it’s “free”, and it’s definitely important to do as quickly as possible. But don’t minimize the impact taking a car to a dealership can have on a large segment of the population (including me, being self-employed).

      Let me ask you this: Why didn’t the US Gov’t and the auto manufacturers negotiate that Takata had to pay for on-site service of these potentially deadly airbags? Given that this severe problem is entirely at the feet of Takata and the auto manufacturers themselves (for having done inadequate testing of Takata’s design), don’t you think that personal responsibility on the part of Takata and the auto manufacturers should have included on-site replacements of these defective, potentially deadly, government-required devices? I do.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: